Long Island Shields Cop of the Month December 2015

On Thurs. Oct. 8th,2015 at approximately 1330 hrs. Police Officer Christopher Canale of the NYC Police Department, Transit Bureau was traveling with his family on the Long Island Expressway in Suffolk County, NY. While he was driving westbound on the LIE between exits 69 and 70 , he observed a small yellow school bus that had crashed into the rear of a tractor trailer. The school bus was engulfed in flames and spewing black smoke into the air. Due to the smoke PO Canale could not see into the school bus and reasonably believed it to be occupied by children. After parking his private vehicle far enough away from the accident scene to ensure the safety of his family, he ran to the school bus. The officer was still not able to see the interior of the bus due to the heavy smoke condition. He then pried open the door of the bus and saw the driver was pinned in the vehicle, he asked the driver if there was anyone else on the bus and was informed by the driver there were no children , but, there was a matron in the rear of the bus. The officer still could not see into the interior of the bus and he instructed the matron to walk toward his voice , he met her halfway down the aisle and assisted her to safety. After removing the matron the officer returned to the driver and was able to extricate him from the bus.

Police Officer Christopher Canales’ actions although off duty and with his family exhibit the highest values of the NYC Police Department. His decisive actions and his courage , placing himself in harms’ way with complete disregard for his own safety is highly commendable. His actions are a tribute to the NYPD and the entire law enforcement community.

For his efforts in saving these two people from either serious injury or worse, the LI Shields are proud to honor PO Christopher Canale as the Cop of the Month.

November 2015: President Message

It has often been said that a picture is worth a thousand words. Well, the picture on this page tells of the culmination of 43 and a half years of determination and dedication by the people who fought for Patrolman Phil Cardillo’s rightful recognition and due respect.
101915_dedication_emk 008.JPG
In 1972 Patrolman Cardillo was ambushed and assassinated in the 116th St. Harlem Mosque. Thanks to the determination of many, Phil was finally honored on Monday, October 19th. I had the privilege to attend the street naming ceremony at the NYPD academy on 28th Ave. Flushing Queens. Isn’t it ironic that the street in front of the academy is 28th Avenue, as Phil was a member of the 28th Pct. when he met his demise. As frustrating as this procedure was I believe the untiring efforts were very much appreciated by Phil’s on, Todd, and the entire Cardillo family. Thanks to to all who worked so long and so hard.

Ptl. Phillip Cardillo Street Renaming Ceremony

Upcoming Events: Next Meeting (12/10) and Holiday Party (12/13)

Our next meeting is Thursday, December 10th at the Coral House in Baldwin.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Also, don’t forget on Sunday, December 13th is the Children’s Holiday Party! Remember to get all your children and grandchildren ready to attend Mike and Noel’s 2015 Shields’ children’s Christmas party. As always it should be a fun party and Bob Forester has promised that Santa will make an appearance.

Not a Prayer!… (?)

The Commencement Exercises for the Jacob Gunther Elementary School were held on June 24, 1992 with this chaplain’s name (mine!) listed after the word, “Invocation.” Anyone going to the files in that school can still find that program and see my name printed in it – and perhaps never realize that I never got to say a word… or even attend! The poor principal, in some embarrassment, phoned me at 2:00 p.m. that June afternoon and shared the news that the school was now expected to follow the Supreme Court’s recent ruling forbidding prayer at a school ceremony and that I should not come to that place at 7:00!

It seems that a certain Daniel and Deborah Weisman of Rhode Island had brought a case against prayer in school to court… and it made it all the way to Washington where the Supreme Court upheld the ban in Lee v. Weisman, making it the law of the land to exclude the prayers.

I recall writing a newsletter article for the congregation I served at the time, explaining that it might be a good thing to spare people from the unwelcome presence of such a thing that sets some of them at odds with others who pray. I shared my experience of prayers attempted at other ceremonies in which the high school graduates made no attempt to hide the beer bottles from which they were drinking (in caps and gowns!) and no disguising their inattention to the words being spoken or to the spirit of respect and consideration. Such deportment troubled, disappointed, and even shocked some standing with dignity while others of the opposite spirit raised a din, while no one in authority ever said or did a thing.

So in this season of the year, when many people of faith remember with thanksgiving the freedoms we enjoy in this nation, where stories of faith can be told without threat of hindrance. There is feasting in the retelling of powerful deliverance from long-term abuse in Egypt (with miraculous establishment of a special people, God’s own people – through the sea and into the Promised Land) and the assurance that the Mighty One displays authority that conquers the very fear and sting of death itself in a surprise Third Day that changed defeated and sorrowing followers into bold and confident celebrants of the power of love and new life. How appropriate to pause… and pray.

I marvel that, in this world of so much coarseness and mockery, every meeting of the Long Island Shields includes some moments… of prayer. How unlike so many other groups we are – that we pause in our busy lives and – as a group of friends – share in reflective moments of attention of a Power greater than ourselves. It makes me feel so honored to be included in such a worthy tradition!

JGAnderson, Chaplain